Tag Archives: b-roll

Our Most Recent Corporate Video Shoot

Top Corporate Video Production Shoot

Last Friday, SVG was on set to film a corporate video in collaboration with Wells Fargo. SVG was hired to shoot a series of videos for the company’s “Customer Business Stories,” which is meant to advertise the small businesses that Wells Fargo represents. For this particular video, the set was at a Boxborough veterinary clinic, where we interviewed the founder and owner, as well as shot extensive amounts of B-roll to layer over the footage. In order to produce a successful video, SVG brought in the help of a professional Boston video crew.

Professional Video Equipment

There were two Sony FS7 cameras set up, one for a wider shot, and one for a closer shot of the talent. They were the two primary cameras used on set. Then, in order to shoot the B-Roll, the professional videographers on set used shoulder rigs and mobile tripods to get shots of the animals at the clinic, the facilities, external shots of the building, and the doctor performing various actions, such as lecturing, performing checkups, and brushing the pet’s teeth. One of the plans for B-Roll footage was to attach a GoPro to one of the dogs in order to get a POV shot.

The Audio Equipment

For the audio setup during the interview, a shotgun microphone was placed above the talent just outside of the shot, which made sure that her voice was picked up clearly and in a reasonable decibel range. For extra coverage and clarity, a lavaliere microphone was attached to her clothing. An audio booth was set up towards the back of the room so that the crew member, with the use of headphones, was able to gauge the varying levels and clearness of the talent’s voice. Moreover, the audio had to be directed three ways, which is called a video village. The audio had to be sent to the two FS7 cameras, and then to the actual audio recording device.

Lighting for Production Shoots

For this particular interview, there was an extensive lighting setup. Several LED lights –Lite Softboxes — were used to counteract the backlight, which was coming in through the window behind the talent. The key and fill lights were strategically placed so that the interviewee was evenly lit, which gave the video a professional look. Since LED lights are quite harsh, it was important to diffuse some of the light and reflect it elsewhere. For the B-Roll, there was a battery powered mobile LED box, which was used as needed when moving around the hospital.

In order to produce a successful video, every element of the production process has to be harmonious and planned with great detail. While the set had not been seen until the actual day of shooting, and while there was some troubleshooting with regard to positioning certain lights, there was still a cohesive plan that coordinated with the schedule. Every member of the crew was aware of their respective on-set roles, which made for an incredibly adept day of filming.

Skillman Videography Group LLC specializes in Boston video marketing. Call us anytime at 1-800-784-0140.

How Much B-Roll is Too Much?

In the production industry, B-Roll can be defined as supplemental footage that drives the story forward. It is correspondent to the A-Roll, which can be identified as the primary storyteller. No matter what you are shooting, the implementation of B-Roll is essential. For example, for documentaries, network news, or corporate videos, the A-Roll is the interviews. The B-Roll, however, would depict the footage that cuts away to shots of the subject, scene, setting, characters, and overall action, which is unique to every film. B-Roll shows viewers the story rather than simply telling it. It is responsible for presenting viewers with visuals to go along with the interviews.

Boston videographer

There is no such thing as too much B-Roll. The key is to film enough of it so that editors are able to insert the footage where it best fits. It is for this reason that there is no such thing as filming too many additional shots. The goal is to keep the story moving, to let it flow seamlessly. It confirms what the A-Roll is describing, making the visual aspect of the video all the more engaging. It would be unfair to categorize A-Roll as the more important, while it serves to establish and describe the film’s subject, B-Roll is what makes the story real, tangible, and comprehensible. Due to the advancement of editing software, the importance of each has become equal, yet the term “A and B editing” has stuck.

Regardless of the type of video, storytelling must be incorporated. They treat each set of footage as a team meant to shape a narrative, working together rather than competing with each other. If your video seems too monotonous, add in some B-Roll footage. Similarly, if the visual component is too distracting from the principal story, scale back. It is all about achieving a balance. Sometimes, there is a misconception that a shot may look better than it actually does, and there are lack of footage in the editing room. If all of the shots are out of focus, set up incorrectly, too light or dark, the video will not be visually successful.

boston video production

SVG, a video production company, partakes in shoots on a regular basis. Therefore, our video crews try to shoot as much B-Roll as possible. Naturally, a filmmaker wants their piece to reflect their best work. To do so, it is imperative to have options. Taking the extra time to film the same shot two or three more times, getting some additional footage of the video’s subject or its surroundings, truly makes all the difference. The more the better. When it comes to shooting, it is important to gather as much as you can so that there is no last minute panic in the editing room. If anything, you want a surplus of imagery to choose from to create a beautiful piece with a central theme and subject.

Skillman Video Group LLC specializes in video production Boston. Call us anytime at 1-800-784-0140.

Terms for Every Boston Videographer

“Angle’s” isn’t just a geometry term, and is quite often used in Boston video production terms. Who would have thought we use geometry in video production. Well the truth is we use the term “angle” more than the actual mathematics. Options and angles work incoherently. As a Boston video company it is important to have more than one option of a particular scene, and even so having close-ups, medium shots, and wide angle shots of that scene (just to name a few). What is this point of all of this? Well, it’s simple all of these options are for our editing team in post-production.

As a Boston videographer for Skillman Video Group it isn’t just enough to have the top of the line equipment. Experience and a keen eye on detail makes the difference in an average marketing video and the best Boston marketing video. Although there is a lot of trial and error when first starting out as a professional videographer, knowing the types of shots and equipment needed to get the perfect shot.

Here is an overview of Boston Video Production Terms for Boston videographers just starting out:

  • Extreme Wide Shot (EWS)- Shot taken from far away where the subject isn’t visible.
  • Very Wide Shot (VWS)- The environment around the subject is still prominent and the subject is barely visible.
  • Wide Shot (WS)- The subject takes up the entire camera frame.
  • Medium Shot (MS)- Shows part of subject in more detail.
  • Medium Close-Up (MCU)- Closer than a medium shot but further away than a close-up on the subject.
  • Close-Up (CU)- A feature of the subject taking up the full frame.
  • Extreme Close-Up (ECU)- Shows extreme detail of the subject.
  • Cut-In (CI)- Shows other areas of the subject in extreme detail.
  • Cutaway (CA)- A shot of something that is not the subject.
  • Over-The-Shoulder Shot (OSS)- Focusing on the subject over the shoulder of another person.
  • Point-Of-View Shot (POV)- The view of the subject.

Besides types of Boston video company camera shots, here are some other terms a professional videographer should keep in mind while on set for a corporate video production company.

  • Color-Temperature- The red, blue, and yellow colors given off in the room. The different color temperatures from scene to scene must be consistent.
  • B-roll– Alternate footage to go with interviewees topic of discussion.
  • Depth of Field (DOF)- The distance between the nearest and furthest subjects that the camera must adjust to focus on.
  • Boom Microphone- A microphone attached to the end of the pole. This microphone is used to pick up more audio from the actors without getting into the camera’s frame. Used in conjunction with a lavaliere.
  • Lavaliere- A small microphone hidden under the actors or interviewees clothing.
  • Aspect Ratio-The size in which the film has been shot. 16:9 is most common.
  • Pan-Following the subject either vertically or horizontally
  • White Balance-The color balance on the camera. Before filming either make sure the white balance is on auto or it is adjusted using a blank white piece of paper

Being a Boston video company like SVG means having a production team that has experience and a great deal of knowledge surrounding everything from pre-production, producing, professional videography, and post-production editing. Although this is just a snippet of some of the most common corporate video production words, it will help any Boston videographer get started in the big city.

post-production

Intern: Post-Production

Knowledge and experience are the result of adversity and critiques. Practice doesn’t make perfect, but perfect practice makes perfect. Practicing video production is no different, and as Skillman Video Group’s intern, I was able to use my prior experience to produce dozens of articles on video production and video marketing.

Producing a video for Skillman Video Group can be intimidating, especially when working for a company that holds itself to the highest of standards. Although filming the video and interviewing our CEO and Creative Director Christina Skillman seemed like an easy task, the post-production editing proved to me that every little element makes a difference to the larger picture.

Color Correction

color-correction YouTube has proven to be a great video marketing tool, and when it came to learning about an unfamiliar program and color correction, YouTube again showed its worth. There are many different strategies for color correction in Adobe Premiere Pro. After tampering with a few, I found that the best color-correction workflow was to correct using RGB scopes. One problem that gave me the greatest difficulty in post-production was matching the color temperature of the b-roll shots to the interview’s. Again, I found that the RGB scopes gave me the best results and allowed me to better match the color temperature of the separate shots.

Also using the color scale is a handy tool when trying to match color temperatures. This gave me a better look at the RGB color data, so I knew which colors needed to be toned down and which ones needed to be increased. Overall, next time when filming I will make sure to better match the color temperature of the interviews and b-roll shots so it will make for less of a hassle in post-production.

B-roll

There is never too much b-roll. B-roll is an important element to a video especially when having to provide visuals for the interview topic. The audience doesn’t just want to look at the interviewee the whole time, so providing b-roll images that fits in with the dialogue. Going back through the b-roll shots I took, I wish that I had taken more. Having options is the greatest benefit of a video and will ultimately lead to its success. Although I had b-roll clips that worked, it wasn’t up to my standards nor SVG’s. SVG is all about high quality and though I had b-roll shots that would be considered as highly valuable, the rest were average.

B-roll

audio+ music

Deciding on background music can be tricky. I knew I wanted uplifting feel-good music in the background that wasn’t nostalgic or too aggressive. The video is meant to provide information to SVG’s clients on preparing for a video marketing meeting so the music should express the emotion of the video. After exploring different songs, and testing each in the video sequence, I finally found the right song on Premium Beat, which was uplifting and fit in perfectly with the video. When adding music into a sequence, the music audio and dialogue audio needs to be adjusted so that the music doesn’t overshadow the dialogue. Using keyframes allows the editor to adjust the audio in certain areas that are either to high or too low.

Details

After reviewing the video with Christina Skillman, there were areas of the video that I could improve editing wise, but and as a video producer I learned to look at the smaller elements of video production. Even a scrunched up shirt and messy hair can cause a distraction to the audience and can offset the video. Looking at every detail and making adjustments is what separates the high quality videos from the average. Though I am proud of the video I produced I learned that there are always areas to improve whether it be as a video producer or an editor in post-production

Skillman Video Group LLC is a Boston video production company. Call us anytime at 1-800-784-0140.

Video production

On set with SVG

B-rollVideo production is intimidating for any recent college graduate, but with help from experienced professionals any concept can come to life. Through the past two months I have learned a lot working with Skillman Video Group like the importance of storytelling, being organized, and not settling for average. Working as the head student producer for my college was nothing compared to the real world of professional video production.

Skillman Video Group has high standards and I didn’t want my video to be anything less than great. Editing has always been my forte but professional cinematography and lighting was slightly out of my realm of expertise. I was able to borrow some filming equipment from my former professor at university, which would make the filming task easier because I was familiar with the equipment.

Equipment:

  • Sony XD video camera –Filming the interview
  • Nikon DSLR d3300 camera- Filming B-roll
  • Tripod- Camera stability
  • 2 high voltage lighting fixtures- Illuminate room and interviewee
  • Lavaliere- Record interview
  • Headphones-listen to audio

Concept

The concept for this video was to provide helpful insight to SVG’s potential clients regarding what businesses should consider before setting up a meeting to discuss a marketing video. After some discussion we decided interviewing Christina Skillman, SVG CEO and creative director, would be best. Besides, any business wants to be informed directly from a producer.

Set-up

Video Production For the interview setting I wanted the style to be documentary. I had worked with documentary style videos in the past and SVG had recently done a shoot using this technique. Fortunately, Christina Skillman was the only person I had to interview so we wouldn’t have to continuously change up interview spots. The interview would take place in an SVG office located in Faneuil Hall. However, filming in an office can have its difficulties. For one we are constricted on space, and second the sound from the busy Boston streets and conversations from the offices next door. Sound a lack of depth would be an issue to overcome, but the rustic brick walls as the background made up for it. Because it was a sunny day in Boston natural lighting illuminated the room enough that we only needed one lighting fixture. Though we had the brick wall as our background, it’s also important to include props. We angled the chair Christina would be sitting in so the brick wall would be seen as well as the shelf with props. With any interview setting it’s important to have enough room between the seating of the interviewee and the background. Fortunately Jack, SVG’s Marketing Coordinator, was there to help run the camera while I asked Christina the questions.

Lighting

Once settled into the setting we adjusted the lighting. Yes, natural lighting is great but clouds can cause problems. We puts the shades up over the windows which allowed some natural lighting to come through but we used the lighting fixture to provide the most illumination.

Sound

Headphones are the best tool to have on set when listening to audio. If background sound is picked up from the lavaliere we are able to detect it right away and start the interview question over. Though we were concerned with street noise and conversations happening in the offices next door, we only had to stop once to redo a question.

B-roll

Before filming I made a list of the B-roll I needed to capture that would relate to the interview questions and answers:

  • Person writing notes
  • Person walking and pondering (soul searching)
  • Person pretending to work at desk in front of computer
  • Person sitting down with their clients
  • Person looking out the window pondering
  • On the computer plugging in numbers or has a spread sheet open
  • On the computer looking at SVG videos
  • Walking into the SVG building
  • Talking on the phone
  • Christina shaking hands with client (person)
  • Christina talking with the client (person)
  • Person at their place of business

B-rollBefore capturing b-roll with Christina, I decided to take some b-roll of myself pretending to be the client. I was able to film at a family friends office where I gave off the impression that I was working and pondering. Overall the b-roll was average. It’s difficult acting and filming at the same time especially when you can’t see how the image looks. Nevertheless, I was able to capture more b-roll on the day of filming. However, instead of using the Sony XD video camera, I opted to use my Nikon DSLR camera just in case I ran out of card space on the video camera.

After moving desks, chairs, and video equipment around, Christina and Jack pretended to talk while I filmed them seemingly having a discussion about video marketing. I took different angles of the two looking at the computer and going through the SVG homepage, shaking hands, and having a conversation. Once that was finished, Jack took the reigns on filming and shot me pretending to work at my desk and taking phone calls. This b-roll would also be incorporated into the video.

Post-production

post-productionOnce filming was finished we found that we had enough content and subjects to make two videos. Each would be around the two-minute range and would incorporate the first concept of knowing what to have in order before creating a marketing video, and the benefits of a professional video marketing company. Though editing is my favorite part when it comes to production, finding a program that would support the video and allow a wide range of tools was difficult. Moving into the final stages of post-production my goal is to create perfection and export a video that is visually effective and informative for the SVG clients.

Skillman Video Group LLC is a Boston video production company. Call us anytime at 1-800-784-0140.